Atlantic City Boardwalk Holocaust Memorial  
 
   
Design Competition

About the Competition

Between November 2010 and March 2011, an open design competition was sponsored by ACBHM, and led by Chairperson, Jon Fox, MD.

The competition was an open, two-stage design competition. At the first stage, digital submission of the design concept was online only. These were judged anonymously by members of our distinguished Jurors, who chose 13 finalists.

Each finalist was awarded an honorarium of $2,500 to develop a three-dimensional model and a fully realized scheme for the site. All final presentations were publicly exhibited and judged at a convocation of the Jurors, and the winner was declared at a public ceremony. The design will be reviewed by the planning board and fine arts board of the city of Atlantic City. In the event the winning design is eventually built, the winner will be awarded a prize of $25,000.

This competition sought to stimulate fresh thinking about public memorials. Participants were encouraged to contemplate the meaning of the Holocaust and genocide in our lives today, and to invent a fitting design for this time and this place. We looked to our entrants to propose the appropriate metaphors and forms for such a Memorial. 



About the Jurors

Daniel Liebeskind, B.ARCH. M.A. BDA AIA is an international figure in architectural practice and urban design. With over forty projects worldwide, Mr. Libeskind’s practice extends from museums and concert halls to convention centers, universities, hotels, shopping centers, and residential projects. Born in Łódź, Poland in 1946, Mr. Libeskind was a virtuoso accordion player at a young age before giving up music to become an architect. Today he is universally known for introducing a new critical discourse into architecture and for his multidisciplinary approach.

Daniel Libeskind's prominence in the United States was firmly established in 2003 with his selection as the master planner commissioned to rebuild the World Trade Center site in New York City, the most significant, complex, politically and emotionally charged American architectural project in decades.  He has also worked on several other master plans, ranging in stages from concept to completion, including:Busan, South Korea; Copenhagen, Denmark;  Milan, Italy; and Seoul, South Korea.

Noted for his captivating museum architecture and dramatic urban designs, Daniel Libeskind creates architecture of spiritual and ethical resonance. His ideas have influenced a new generation of architects and those interested in the future development of cities and culture. In 2001, he became the first architect awarded the Hiroshima Art Prize, given to an artist whose work promotes understanding and peace. In 2003, he was appointed the first Cultural Ambassador for Architecture by the U.S. Department of State.

Daniel Libeskind has taught and lectured at universities all over the world, received numerous awards and designed world-renowned projects, including the Jewish Museum in Berlin, which opened to the public in September 2001 to wide public acclaim, the Danish Jewish Museum opened in Copenhagen in June 2004, and the Glass Courtyard, an extension to the Jewish Museum Berlin, which covers the original Courtyard, completed in the Fall 2007. Upon winning the World Trade Center design competition in February 2003, Daniel Libeskind was appointed as master plan architect for the site in New York City.  Memory Foundations is now under construction.

Daniel resides in New York City with his wife and business partner, Nina Libeskind.

 

 

Dr. Michael Berenbaum is a Professor of Jewish Studies and Director of the Sigi Ziering Institute: Exploring the Ethical and Religious Implications of the Holocaust at the American Jewish University in Los Angeles. He was the Executive Editor of the Encylpcaedia Judaica a 22 volume 16 million word project.

 Professor Berenbaum was the Project Director of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum overseeing its creation and later director of its Research Institute. He is also the author or editor of 20 books.

 

 

Richard Meier, FAIA, FRIBA, received his architectural training at Cornell University and established his own office in New York City in 1963.  Since that time his international practice has encompassed major cultural and civic commissions as well as private residences, and corporate and academic facilities. 


Mr. Meier has received the highest honors in the field including the Pritzker Prize for Architecture, the Gold Medals of the American Institute of Architects and the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Praemium Imperiale from the Japan Art Association and the Gold Medal for Architecture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He is best known for The Getty Center in Los Angeles; the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art; and the Jubilee Church in Rome, Italy.
Recent and current work includes the City Hall in San Jose, The Cornell University Life Sciences and Technology Building, the Museum of the Ara Pacis in Rome, the 165 Charles Street Apartments in New York City and the Burda Collection Museum in

 

 

Wendy Evans Joseph, FAIA is president of Wendy Evans Joseph Architecture, the architectural and planning practice she founded in 1996. Prior to founding her firm, Ms. Joseph was a senior associate of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners where she played a significant role in the design of The United States Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C. In 2002 she was able to build on that knowledge for the creation of a Holocaust Memorial Garden and exhibition in Salt Lake City. Her other projects include a long-span pedestrian bridge over East 63rd Street in New York City; and a boutique hotel and restaurant in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Price Tower in Bartlesville, Oklahoma.

  Ms. Joseph graduated with a Master in Architecture from Harvard University Graduate School of Design after earning her BA at the University of Pennsylvania.  She won the Rome Prize in Architecture and was a Fellow at the American Academy in Rome. In 2003, Ms. Joseph was elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects. In addition to her studio design work, Ms. Joseph is actively involved in a number of professional and cultural organizations. She is immediate past president of the Architectural League of New York; past chairman of the American Institute of Architects National Committee on Design and past president of the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

 

 

Clifford Chanin founded The Legacy Project in 2000, a non-profit research group dedicated to documenting contemporary responses – in visual art, literature, film and public debates about memory – to historical traumas in societies around the world.  (www.legacy-project.org) Chanin is curator of the Legacy of Absence collection for the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center.  This collection, one of the Museum’s permanent exhibitions, includes art made in the aftermath of mass violence in many different societies.  (www.ilholocaustmuseum.org) He is co-editor of Blooming Through the Ashes: An Anthology on Violence and the Human Spirit (Rutgers University Press, 2008). Chanin is also senior program advisor at the National September 11 Memorial Museum

For ten years, Chanin was associate director of Arts and Humanities at the Rockefeller Foundation, where his work included programs on museums, university development, book publishing, contemporary issues in the humanities and international philanthropy. During his time at Rockefeller, Chanin created a programming initiative in the Muslim world, focusing on issues of pluralism and civil society. Chanin has worked as a journalist and as a spokesman for the Mayor of New York.  A native New Yorker, Chanin received a B.A. from Wesleyan University, and master’s degrees in journalism and international affairs from Columbia University.

 

 

Dr. James E. Young is Professor of English and Judaic Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where he has taught since 1988, and currently Chair of the Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies. He has also taught at New York University as a Dorot Professor of English and Hebrew/Judaic Studies (1984-88), at Bryn Mawr College in the History of Religion, and at the University of Washington, Harvard University, and Princeton University as a visiting professor. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California in 1983.

Professor Young is the author of Writing and Rewriting the Holocaust (1988), The Texture of Memory (Yale University Press, 1993), which won the National Jewish Book Award in 1994, and At Memory's Edge:  After-images of the Holocaust in Contemporary Art and Architecture (Yale University Press, 2000).  He was also the Guest Curator of an exhibition at the Jewish Museum in New York City, entitled "The Art of Memory:  Holocaust Memorials in History" (March - August 1994, with venues in Berlin and Munich, September 1994 - June 1995) and was the editor of The Art of Memory

In 1997, Professor Young was appointed by the Berlin Senate to the five-member Findungskommission for Germany's national "Memorial to Europe's Murdered Jews," dedicated in May 2005.  He has also consulted with Argentina’s government on its memorial to the desaparacidos, as well as with numerous city agencies on their memorials and museums.  Most recently, he was appointed by the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation to the jury for the World Trade Center Site Memorial competition, now under construction. Professor Young is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture Grants, and a Yad Hanadiv Fellowship at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, among others.

In 2000, he was appointed as Editor-in-Chief of the Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, a ten-volume anthology of primary sources, documents, texts, and images, forthcoming with Yale University Press.  At present, he is completing an insider’s story of the World Trade Center Memorial, entitled Memory at Ground Zero: A Juror’s Report on the World Trade Center Site Memorial.

 


The Judging Process

The competition was an open, two-stage design competition. At the first stage, digital submission of the design concept was online only. These were judged anonymously by members of our distinguished Jurors, who chose 13 finalists. Each finalist was awarded an honorarium of $2,500 to develop a three-dimensional model and a fully realized scheme for the site. All final presentations were publicly exhibited and judged at a convocation of the Jurors, and the winner was declared at a public ceremony. The Atlantic City Boardwalk Holocaust Memorial organization will enter into good faith negotiations with the winning competitor for a contract to provide the services necessary to realize the Memorial. Concurrently the design will be reviewed by the planning board and fine arts board of the city of Atlantic City. In the event the winning design is eventually built, the winner will be awarded a prize of $25,000 in addition to commensurate fees for services. 


Why This Design?

In its two primary formal elements—buckled boards and interstitial river of light—“Fractured Landscape” brilliantly articulates both the irredeemable destruction of a civilization and the necessary, if impossible to realize, desire to stitch the broken pieces together through memory.  

 In the words of winning architects Patrick Lausell and Paola Marquez, “Interrupting the linearity of the Boardwalk, the platform is a rupture, a disruptive force, an illogical moment in the sequence of history.”  The flowing sliver of light they have wedged between the broken surfaces is meant as both a visual rupture that pulls the curious passersby into the structure and as a broken shard that simultaneously connects the memorial to the Boardwalk, even as it cuts into the Boardwalk itself.  That is, it takes visitors off the Boardwalk and leaves them on the Boardwalk, but now inwardly changed.

 This design is especially compelling for the way it seems to take an existing part of the Boardwalk, something familiar and reassuringly continuous, and then breaks and buckles its horizontal plane, as if as if there had been a seismic event, a shifting of tectonic plates beneath.  Visitors will know that something happened here, and that it points to something that happened in Europe some 65 years ago. This section of the Boardwalk, now broken and buckled, reflects something broken in all of us, something that keeps breaking whenever we remember the annihilation of the Jews of Europe during World War II.  “Fractured Landscape” is a subtle but powerful reminder that attempts to integrate such memory into the public sphere can also cause something to disintegrate in all of us:  it is both a rupture and a repair.

ACBHM Juror James E. Young, 
Distinguished Professor, 
Department of Judaic & Near Eastern Studies, 
University of Massachusetts Amherst


Winning Architects

Patrick Lausell, Adjunct Faculty, Boston Architectural College, is an educator and designer interested in projects that engage public space and blur the distinction between art and architecture. Patrick is originally from San Juan, Puerto Rico and Miami, FL. He works as an Independent Architectural Consultant in Boston, MA and teaches an Advanced Architectural Studio at the Boston Architectural College. He received a B.Arch from the BAC and a Masters Degree in Advanced Architectural Design from Columbia University. In 2007, Patrick was awarded the William and Bertha Nast Scholarship and the Boston Society of Architects Scholarship.

Paola Marquez was born in Mexico City in 1978. After graduating from the school of architecture at Universidad Iberoamericana, she began collaborating at Grupo Anima in 2003, where she get involved in the design, managment and development of several residential buildings in Mexico City like Aguascalientes 191 (2003), Juan de la Barrera 56 (2004) and Antonio Sola 72 (2005). Due to her prominent design and management skills she became Project Manager of more complex and larger projects like high rise building Torre Aura Altitude (2005-2007) in the city of Guadalajara, the 65 unit complex Casa Pontoque (2007-2008) in Punta Mita and the 80 apartment building Katari (2007-2008) in Riviera Nayarit,  Mexico. After 5 years, she decided to pursue a Master Degree at Columbia University in the city of New York, from which she graduated from in 2009. Back in Mexico City she founded in 2010, Marquezstudio, an Architecture and Design firm with current projects to be completed in 2011.

In 2010, Patrick and fellow Columbia Alum Paola were unanimously selected as the 1st place winners of the Atlantic City Boardwalk Holocaust Memorial Design Competition.


Architectural Renderings

Patrick Lausell and fellow Columbia Alum Paola Marquez were unanimously selected as the 1st place winners of the Atlantic City Boardwalk Holocaust Memorial Design Competition.